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listen/watch/read: entertainment for retro girls

It’s been a hot minute since I last shared some of the retro-themed media I’ve been enjoying! If you’re looking for some entertainment that centers around the days gone by, check these out!

Listen

You Must Remember This I actually reccommended this podcast in my first Listen/Watch/Read post, but it has recently returned for a new season radder than ever. You Must Remember This explores the grittier or hidden stories of Old Hollywood; it’s fantastically well-researched, and the host has a lovely soothing voice.  I started listening with the fascinating “Charles Manson’s Hollywood” series, and while that’s probably always going to be my favorite, a close second is the new/current series: “Dead Blondes.” The series looks at famous blonde starlets of Old Hollywood, how their audience and fans projected on them, often how studios mistreated them, and, as the title implies, how they died.

The Dollop This podcast is a new fave. It’s not strictly vintage/retro, but it is all about American history, so I think it counts! If you like wacky tales of history, guys doing silly accents, and general hilarity, check it out.

Watch

Hidden Figures I wrote a full post about this movie, but I have to plug it again here because it was SO GOOD. The untold story of the black women who made the moon landing possible is so important and so inspiring, and the dedication of the production to period-appropriate costume design makes it seriously artful too. I highly recommend this interview with Renee Ehrlich Kalfus, the designer, to get insight about each of the main trio’s costumes. (The actresses all wore period-appropriate undergarments too!)

The Collection I haven’t actually watched this new Amazon Prime series yet, but I’m super intrigued! Fashion drama in post-war Paris? Yes, please!

Read

Tinseltown: Murder, Morphine and Madness at the Dawn of Hollywood Usually my Old Hollywood fixation starts in the 1940s, but this exploration of the drama and scandals of the film industry in the 1920s was fascinating. This is a non-fiction book written in a novel-esque style; it gravitates around the 1922 murder of popular director William Desmond Taylor but with tendrils that show the dramatic lives and secrets of other Hollywood stars as well as the machinations of studio execs. Personally, I felt that the writing style of the book was a little overwrought at times (it kept hammering home the SECRETS!! and MYSTERY!!), but the story was interesting enough to keep me involved.

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